Tobold's Blog
Sunday, September 03, 2017
 
Microtaur

Note to self: Check the size of a monster in the Monster Manual before printing it in 3D. I printed a group of minotaurs of medium size, a head taller than a human. That was basically the size I had in mind because of the tauren in World of Warcraft. But then I realized that in D&D a minotaur is of "large" size, which means that he takes up 2x2 spaces on a battlemap. So I need to print him with a 2" base, and make him at least 2" tall for that to look proportional. So I threw away my "microtaurs" and printed the group in large size instead.

The adventure I am preparing has a number of large or even bigger monsters: Minotaurs, a beholder, a hill giant, an oni, and a dragon. And I must say that I am quite pleased with how those came out from 3D printing. The larger models have less problems of thin parts being too thin to print right. The details come out a lot better. And as the software automatically fills the bulk with a mostly hollow support structure, I can print them to scale without spending a fortune. In the role-playing club I play in there is a cupboard with a collection of painted metal miniatures. But metal is expensive as a material, and heavy in bulk, so the large monsters in that collection are actually not bigger than the medium ones. The beholder in the collection is a sphere of less than 1" diameter, so my 2" sphere beholder looks impressive compared to it, even if mine is just plastic and unpainted. Not to mention my 4" tall hill giant and dragon, which I think will really impress my players.

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